Author Archives: thegoodbadbook

Determining Editions: The Flapper Wife

Back in February, in what feels like a different lifetime, I began thinking more about my copy of The Flapper Wife by Beatrice Burton.  I had been reading a different Burton title, which I really ought to review on this blog … Continue reading

Posted in 1920s, Beatrice Burton, Grosset and Dunlap | 4 Comments

Party Girl

Oh, Party Girl.  Come for the silly title, stay for the (unsatisfying) discussion of double standards and the modern women’s experience.  Also, for those of us who like Midwestern settings, Party Girl takes place in Terre Haute, Indiana! Party Girl: a Love … Continue reading

Posted in 1920s, Chelsea House, Vivian Grey | 1 Comment

Triplicate Cover Art – and an Announcement!

Sometimes when I buy a book, I have already seen a picture of it and know what I’m getting.  Other times, if the book is described as being in very good condition or better, I’ll buy it “blind” and hope … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Substitute Sweetheart

“Suppose you loved a man with all your heart and he, while terribly ill wanted you to marry him, thinking you were another girl – Would you do it?” That is the totally ridiculous question that leads the front panel … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Evolution of the Sparkling Romances of The Modern Girl

2018 is now in full swing.  In late January I wrapped up my commitments to my regional Mock Newbery and Caldecott committees (and introduced a book for Newbery!) and February kicked off a regional Teen Literature Reading Challenge that I … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Fall 2017 News – Honey & Wax Book Collecting Prize

Happy Thanksgiving weekend!  In addition to being grateful for good food, wonderful company, and elastic waistbands, there’s something else I’ve been grateful for in 2017.  It’s taken me a while to write about it, and I think word has already … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Blind Date

“What must a girl do to be popular?” Cynthia Carter couldn’t get a date to her town’s Valentine’s dance and has just been stood up in the worst way.  A blind date scuttled off after pretending to be called away, … Continue reading

Posted in 1930s, Grosset and Dunlap, Mach Tey, Vida Hurst | 7 Comments